Everyday birds.

Twit twit twit…I suppose that is bird language for hello
So how many of these melodious creatures do you know?


 This post is all about birds, I like birds a lot and many are the time I will stop and try to identify whenever I hear them call. 
I must say my love for birds came much later in life. How, I wondered, could one differentiate these small creatures? To me, they all looked and sounded the same….
Every morning and evening as I walk to and from work, I get to enjoy the chirping and sight many of these beautiful birds.
I know you, just like me, get to see and ‘dance’ to some of these birds.
 
So I put up a few pictures of some of the common birds you are likely to see in your hood as you go about your everyday activities.
And hey, it is never too late to learn, is it? You just might unravel a passion in you!
House Sparrow:Male on the left, Female on the right. This is one of the most common bird you are likely to see just outside your homes.Mainly feeds on seeds.
Baglafecht Weaver
Pied crow – wide spread and can be found in pairs or small groups

Superb Starling

Red-billed Fire Finch – found close to human settlement together with the Red cheeked Cordon-bleu
Red cheeked Cordon-bleu – also found close to human settlement together with Red-billed Fire Finch

White browed Sparrow weaver –  very noisy and found in groups of 2 to 11 individuals.
Collared Sunbird – if you have any flowering plants near your homes or offices, you are likely to see the visitor. Feeds on nectar.
Variable Sunbird -if you have any flowering plants near your homes or offices, you are likely to see the visitor. Feeds on nectar.
Olive Thrush – this is a forest/woodland bird but can be seen in gardens and small thickets in your homesteads.

 Ring-necked Dove –  found alone, in pairs or large flocks

Red-eyed Dove – can be found alone or in pairs

Speckled Mouse-bird – a common bird seen feeding on bushes and backyard gardens. It is also a pest.

 Hadada Ibis

Marabou Stork

Remember you are likely to see many more bird species in your hood due to the fact that different habitats provide different “homes” to the different bird species.

Please note: I don’t own any of the pictures unless stated otherwise. If you see a picture here and you want credit, email me: iamwamuyu@gmail.com

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